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Jeezy Ft. Jay-Z - Seen It All

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Jay Wayne Jenkins (born September 28, 1977), better known by his stage name Young Jeezy or simply Jeezy, is an American hip hop recording artist from Atlanta, Georgia. He is the de facto leader of Southern hip hop group United Streets Dopeboyz of America (USDA) and a former member of Boyz n da Hood as well as the Black Mafia Family (BMF). He embarked on his career in 2001, under an independent label and joined Boyz n da Hood in 2005, the same year his solo major-label debut Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 was released. Its lead single "Soul Survivor", which featured R&B singer Akon, became a top-ten hit in the US.

Jeezy's second album The Inspiration, followed in 2006, and his third The Recession, followed in 2008; both albums yielded chart-topping singles. Jeezy has also appeared on numerous other hip hop and R&B singles such as "Say I" by Christina Milian, "I'm So Paid" by Akon, "Hard" by Rihanna, and "Love in This Club" by Usher, the latter becoming a number one single on the US Billboard Hot 100, in 2008. To date, he has received four Grammy nominations.

Follow @YoungJeezy on twitter!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/seen-it-all-feat.-jay-z-single/id893739140

https://facebook.com/YoungJeezy

 

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Jay Wayne Jenkins (born September 28, 1977), better known by his stage name Young Jeezy or simply Jeezy, is an American hip hop recording artist from Atlanta, Georgia. He is the de facto leader of Southern hip hop group United Streets Dopeboyz of America (USDA) and a former member of Boyz n da Hood as well as the Black Mafia Family (BMF). He embarked on his career in 2001, under an independent label and joined Boyz n da Hood in 2005, the same year his solo major-label debut Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 was released. Its lead single "Soul Survivor", which featured R&B singer Akon, became a top-ten hit in the US.

Jeezy's second album The Inspiration, followed in 2006, and his third The Recession, followed in 2008; both albums yielded chart-topping singles. Jeezy has also appeared on numerous other hip hop and R&B singles such as "Say I" by Christina Milian, "I'm So Paid" by Akon, "Hard" by Rihanna, and "Love in This Club" by Usher, the latter becoming a number one single on the US Billboard Hot 100, in 2008. To date, he has received four Grammy nominations.

Follow @YoungJeezy on twitter!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/seen-it-all-feat.-jay-z-single/id893739140

https://facebook.com/YoungJeezy

 

Hello

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Jay Wayne Jenkins (born September 28, 1977), better known by his stage name Young Jeezy or simply Jeezy, is an American hip hop recording artist from Atlanta, Georgia. He is the de facto leader of Southern hip hop group United Streets Dopeboyz of America (USDA) and a former member of Boyz n da Hood as well as the Black Mafia Family (BMF). He embarked on his career in 2001, under an independent label and joined Boyz n da Hood in 2005, the same year his solo major-label debut Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 was released. Its lead single "Soul Survivor", which featured R&B singer Akon, became a top-ten hit in the US.

Jeezy's second album The Inspiration, followed in 2006, and his third The Recession, followed in 2008; both albums yielded chart-topping singles. Jeezy has also appeared on numerous other hip hop and R&B singles such as "Say I" by Christina Milian, "I'm So Paid" by Akon, "Hard" by Rihanna, and "Love in This Club" by Usher, the latter becoming a number one single on the US Billboard Hot 100, in 2008. To date, he has received four Grammy nominations.

Follow @YoungJeezy on twitter!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/seen-it-all-feat.-jay-z-single/id893739140

https://facebook.com/YoungJeezy

 

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24zxg9f.jpg

Jay Wayne Jenkins (born September 28, 1977), better known by his stage name Young Jeezy or simply Jeezy, is an American hip hop recording artist from Atlanta, Georgia. He is the de facto leader of Southern hip hop group United Streets Dopeboyz of America (USDA) and a former member of Boyz n da Hood as well as the Black Mafia Family (BMF). He embarked on his career in 2001, under an independent label and joined Boyz n da Hood in 2005, the same year his solo major-label debut Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 was released. Its lead single "Soul Survivor", which featured R&B singer Akon, became a top-ten hit in the US.

Jeezy's second album The Inspiration, followed in 2006, and his third The Recession, followed in 2008; both albums yielded chart-topping singles. Jeezy has also appeared on numerous other hip hop and R&B singles such as "Say I" by Christina Milian, "I'm So Paid" by Akon, "Hard" by Rihanna, and "Love in This Club" by Usher, the latter becoming a number one single on the US Billboard Hot 100, in 2008. To date, he has received four Grammy nominations.

Follow @YoungJeezy on twitter!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/seen-it-all-feat.-jay-z-single/id893739140

https://facebook.com/YoungJeezy

 

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Reviewing Your Message



LO6.3

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Describe and apply the components of the reviewing stage, including a FAIR test, proofreading, and feedback.



You will recall from Chapter 5 that expert business writers use their time differently than do average business writers (see Figure 5.2 in Chapter 5). They devote more time to planning and reviewing and proportionately less time to drafting. They spend most of their time-before and after drafting-carefully thinking about how the message will influence and affect others.


Many business professionals get anxious to send their messages as soon as they finish drafting them. It is human nature to want to move on to the next task. Resist the urge to move on without carefully reviewing your messages. During the reviewing stage, you will improve your message, making it far more successful. You will also minimize the possibility of embarrassing and damaging mistakes.


The reviewing process includes three interrelated components: conducting the FAIR test, proofreading, and getting feedback (not generally needed for routine messages). These reviewing components ensure that you show fairness, get the message right, avoid errors, and get perspectives from trusted colleagues. For short, routine messages (one to four paragraphs), expert business writers can often check for fairness and proofread in just a few minutes. For long, important messages, such as business proposals or business plans, the reviewing stage may take weeks or months.



Page 174


TECHNOLOGY TIPS
USING SPELLING AND GRAMMAR CHECKS

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Most word processing software programs contain spelling and grammar checks to help you avoid misspellings and grammatical mistakes. Many of these programs, such as Microsoft Word, also have tools to evaluate writing style and ease of reading. Typically, these tools are not set by default. You will need to manually select them. (In Microsoft Word, you can access these additional tools by changing settings in the Proofing area of Word Options.)


When you run spelling and grammar checks, you can review your document sentence by sentence for passive voice, noun clusters, and other elements. Once you finish the check, you will see a final calculation of readability statistics. Keep in mind that the software is not perfect. Generally, however, it will help you improve your writing style.



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FIGURE 6.3

Stephanie's Final, Easier-to-Read Brochure (compare to original version in Figure 6.1)
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FIGURE 6.3

(Continued)
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Page 177




Conduct a FAIR Test

In Chapter 1, we introduced the FAIR test as a way of ensuring ethical business communication. Of course, you will consider such issues during the planning and writing stages. Also, during the review process you can also take the time to think about the degree to which your entire message conforms to standards for facts, access, impacts, and respect. For important messages—particularly those that involve complicated business issues—apply the FAIR test:



  • Facts: Are you confident in your facts? Are your assumptions clear? Have you avoided slanting the facts or made other logical errors?




  • Access: Have you granted enough access to message recipients about decision making and information? Have you granted enough access to the message recipients to provide input? Are you open about your motives, or do you have a hidden agenda?




  • Impacts: Have you thought about how the message will impact various stakeholders? Have you evaluated impacts on others from ethical, corporate, and legal perspectives?




  • Respect: Have you demonstrated respect for the inherent worth of others: their aspirations, thoughts, feelings, and well-being? Have you shown that you value others?






Proofread

Proofreading involves rereading your entire document to make sure it is influential and accurate. You might consider rereading each sentence several times, each time with a different focus. On your first pass, place yourself in the position of your audience members. Imagine how they will respond. On your second pass, check for problems with writing style and language mechanics.





Get Feedback

As one business writing expert stated, one of the best ways to ensure that your communication is effective and fair is to get feedback from others:



Ask some people whose judgment you respect to give it a test read and get their reaction. Do they think it's too energetic or hyperbolic for the audience and the occasion? Or is it too frosty? Similarly, do they think the writing is too distant or too familiar? What are the offending words or phrases? How can they be changed to do the job at hand? Using test readers is hardly rocket science, but those willing to go through this trouble invariably produce more effective writing.6



This advice reveals an important point: Your trusted colleagues are giving your message a trial run-trying to simulate how the intended message recipient will respond. As they review your message, they can provide insights about making it better. Before they begin to read, ask them to consider whether you have framed the idea correctly, whether the business logic holds up, whether the message has the intended effects, whether the tone is appropriate, and so on. Effective business communicators make a habit of getting this advance feedback for important messages. In the Communication Q&A with Ronald Scott, you can learn more about the importance of clarity, tone, and accuracy in business writing.



Page 178


COMMUNICATION Q&A
CONVERSATIONS WITH CURRENT BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS

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Ronald Scott is the director of community development for Lexington County in South Carolina. He oversees all development ordinances in his community and administers approximately $2 million annually in federal block grant programs that serve low- and moderate-income citizens and communities.


Pete Cardon: How important is trust in the workplace?


Ronald Scott: They are vital. Members of my staff are regularly required to take complex and technical ordinance language and explain it in plain terms to citizens or customers. This requires the ability to capture the essence and translate it into simple language that the customer can understand and act on. In today's workplace, having good writing skills is an asset that will distinguish an employee from his or her peers. One of the first opportunities an employer has to assess writing skills is when he or she reviews an application for employment or a résumé. A basic review of these two documents can either thoroughly impress or completely horrify a potential employer.


PC: How much time do you spend writing? What types of writing?


RS: I spend approximately half my time writing. Examples include writing emails; drafting letters to customers, citizens, and businesses; drafting letters to local, state, and federal officials; reviewing and correcting written documents and reports prepared by staff; creating policy and procedure manuals; creating form letters; creating grant application and grant documents; and creating budget documents and periodic budget reports.


PC: How formal is business writing?


RS: Typically, business writing is a formal means of communication. Recently, one of my employees wrote a letter to a customer he knew quite well. After his salutation he wrote, “How are you doing today? I hope you are doing well and that you are feeling better.” While this language may have been acceptable for an in-person exchange, it seemed too casual and inappropriate for a business letter.


PC: What kinds of writing mistakes do you see most often in the workplace? How damaging are these mistakes? Could you give a recent example?


RS: In my profession we often communicate with large businesses about the cost of development permits for large projects. Some permit fees can be in excess of $50,000. A missing zero in a letter estimating permit fees can make a big difference when a business is preparing its budget. Recently, an employee addressed a letter to a customer about a code violation. He wrote, “You will not need a building permit to complete this work.” He intended to write, “You will need a building permit to complete this work.” What a difference one word made. Some delicate negotiations were necessary to make the situation right with that customer.


PC: How is writing in the workplace different from writing for school projects?


RS: Business writing requires you to maintain business relationships (even when giving bad news), build and maintain company loyalty and morale, retain customers/clients, and portray a positive image for yourself and your company. Academic writing focuses more on its subject than on the reader's reactions or on the goal of cultivating a long relationship with the reader. When writing for business purposes, we need to make sure we do not hamper business transactions and workflow due to misuse of language, inappropriate expressions and emotions, or lack of empathy.





Page 179


Chapter Takeaway for Improving Readability with Style and Design

LO6.1 Describe and apply the following principles of writing style that improve ease of reading: completeness, conciseness, and natural processing. (pp. 158-170)





Improving Ease of Reading with Writing Style

Completeness

Conciseness

Natural Style


  • Provide all relevant information




  • Be accurate.




  • Be specific.






  • Control paragraph length.




  • Use short sentences.




  • Avoid redundancy.




  • Avoid empty phrases.




  • Avoid wordy prepositional phrases.






  • Use action verbs when possible.




  • Use active voice.




  • Use short and familiar words and phrases.




  • Use parallel language.




  • Avoid buzzwords and figures of speech.




  • Avoid it is/there are.







See examples of writing style improvements in Tables 6.1 through 6.15



LO6.2 Explain and use navigational design to improve ease of reading. (pp. 170-173)





Improving Ease of Reading with Navigational Design


  • Headings




  • Highlighting






  • Lists




  • White space






  • Simplicity







See examples of navigational design in Tables 6.16 through 6.18.



LO6.3 Describe and apply the components of the reviewing stage, including a FAIR test, proofreading, and feedback. (pp. 173-178)



FAIR Test: Evaluate your message in terms of facts, access, impacts, and respect.


Proofreading: Ask trusted colleagues to review your message for effectiveness and accuracy.


Feedback: For important messages, ask trusted colleagues to give input about effectiveness and fairness.





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